Endorsed by

ICNE 2021 Virtual Conference

19-20 March, 2021

Why attend the Virtual ICNE Conference?

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

The COVID-19 pandemic and its implications are set to continue for some time. The global health crisis has challenged our model of face-to face meetings – many of us still have travel restrictions and the role of social distancing continues to be crucial to control infection rates.

To adapt to the current situation, the ICNE 2021 Conference Planning Group has come to the decision to transform the International Conference on Neurology & Epidemiology (ICNE) into a fully virtual meeting that will be held on 19-20 March, 2021.

We have a fantastic programme organised, with keynote and plenary presentations and teaching workshops by over 40 internationally recognised experts from all over the world. You will be able to easily meet and communicate with them online!

To help you decide whether to participate or not, let me give you a brief description of the scope and uniqueness of the conference. First of all, why do we need such a conference? As you know, neuroepidemiology has traditionally long been perceived as a science of incidence, prevalence, risk factors, natural history and prognosis of neurological disorders. However, that is only one part of neuroepidemiology called non-experimental neuroepidemiology. The other integral, but commonly forgotten, part of neuroepidemiology is experimental neuroepidemiology; research based on clinical trials of effectiveness or efficacy of various interventions in neurological disorders. This international conference will bring together scientists and experts in all major fields of experimental and non-experimental neurology, with presentations ranging from clinical trials and meta-analyses to cohort, case-control and case-report studies.

The benefits of participation in this conference include:

  • affordable registration fees stratified by the level of training (students, trainees, regular delegates) and country income level (developing vs developed countries);
  • access to all sessions online (no time overlap between presentations);
  • all accepted abstracts published in online issue of Neuroepidemiology before the conference;
  • Visibility/accessibility of your presentation for 3 months after the conference;
  • 12 European CME credits (ECMEC®s) by the European Accreditation Council for
    Continuing Medical Education (EACCME®)
    ;
  • E-Certificate of Presentation and/or Participation by Programme and Scientific Committee

The main topics of the conference are all major neurological disorders, including stroke, dementia, movement disorders, epilepsy, headache.

This international conference will provide an excellent opportunity for neurologists, public health experts, neurosurgeons, epidemiologists, neuropsychologists, rehabilitation specialists, geriatricians, nurses, aged care specialists and health care providers working in the area of experimental and non-experimental epidemiology of neurological disorders to share their new ideas, research findings and experience.

We believe the virtual International Conference on Neurology & Epidemiology will be a great success and look forward to meeting you online.

 

Prof. Valery Feigin, MD, MSc, PhD, FAAN, FRSNZ, FRAS
ICNE Chairman

Prof. Valery Feigin, MD, MSc, PhD, FAAN, FRSNZ, FRAS
ICNE Chairman

Make new contacts in a truly international environment

Interact with more than 40 nationalities from around the world that IANE gathers. Q&A live sessions during/after keynote presentations and networking possibilities.

Follow industry trends

The conference provides the latest research and clinical studies as well as evidence-based recommendations/guidelines enhanced with teaching sessions (access to sessions and posters will be available for up to 3 months after the conference).

Get wider audience for your poster

All posters submitted for the conference are printed in the internationally recognised peer-reviewed online periodical ‘Neuroepidemiology’ issued by Karger Publishers.

Gain CME Credits

Participate in the scientific programme and earn 12 CME credits.

European CME credits (ECMEC®s) are granted by the European Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education (EACCME®)

Keep up-to-date with the newest technology development

There will be an online exhibition platform with 1:1 meetings available 2 weeks prior, during and 2 weeks after the conference.

Conference Topics

Stroke

Movement Disorders

Dementia

Headache

Epilepsy

Biomarkers of neurological disorders

Nursing aspects of neurological care/research

Global Burden of Disease Study Updates

Rufus Olusola Akinyemi

Rufus Olusola Akinyemi

Deputy Director, Centre for Genomic and Precision Medicine, Senior Research Fellow, Neuroscience and Ageing Research Unit, Institute for Advanced Medical Research and Training, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

Margit Alt Murphy

Margit Alt Murphy

Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Ettore Beghi

Ettore Beghi

Department of Neuroscience, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri IRCCS, Milano, Italy

Yannick Béjot

Yannick Béjot

Dijon Stroke Registry, EA 7460 Pathophysiology and Epidemiology of Cerebro-Cardiovascular diseases (PEC2), University Hospital of Dijon, University of Burgundy, France

Derrick Bennett

Derrick Bennett

Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, UK

Julie Bernhardt

Julie Bernhardt

Stroke Division, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Victoria; Director, NHMRC Center of Research Excellence Stroke Rehabilitation and Brain Recovery, Victoria, Australia

Michael Brainin

Michael Brainin

Professor of Clinical Neurology, Danube University Krems, Austria; President, World Stroke Organisation

Dominique Cadilhac

Dominique Cadilhac

Head, Translational Public Health and Evaluation Division, Stroke and Ageing Research, Department of Medicine, School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Victoria; Head Public Health and Health Services Research, Stroke Theme, Florey Institute Neuroscience and Mental Health, Heidelberg, University of Melbourne, Australia

William M. Carroll

William M. Carroll

President, World Federation of Neurology; Department of Neurology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth; Clinical Professor of Neurology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia

Sakshi Chopra

Sakshi Chopra

S P Jain School of Global Management, Singapore

Stephen Davis

Stephen Davis

Director Melbourne Brain Centre at Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Australia

Guenther Deuschl

Guenther Deuschl

Department of Neurology, UKSH, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Germany

Martin Dichgans

Martin Dichgans

President European Stroke Organisation (ESO); Director, Institute or Stroke and Dementia Research, LMU Klinikum, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany

Ding Ding

Ding Ding

Institute of Neurology, Fudan University Huashan Hospital, China

Valery Feigin

Valery Feigin

National Institue for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences, School of Clincal Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

Dorcas Gandhi

Dorcas Gandhi

Department of Neurology, Christian Medical College and Hospital Ludhiana, India

Maurice Giroud

Maurice Giroud

Service of Vascular Neurology, General Neurology and Neuro-degenerative diseases, University Hospital of Dijon-Bourgogne, France

Elena Gnedovskaya

Elena Gnedovskaya

Deputy Director for Research, Organization and Development, Research Center of Neurology, Moscow, Russia

Theresa Green

Theresa Green

University of Queensland/MNHHS Surgical Treatment & Rehabilitation Service (STARS), Brisbane, Australia

Vladimir Hachinski

Vladimir Hachinski

Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, University of Western Ontario, Canada

Graeme Hankey

Graeme Hankey

Professor of Neurology, Medical School, The University of Western Australia; Neurologist, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia

Lisa Harvey

Lisa Harvey

Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Australia

Arfan Ikram

Arfan Ikram

Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands

Carlos N. Ketzoian

Carlos N. Ketzoian

Neuroepidemiology Section, Institute of Neurology, Montevideo, Uruguay

Monique Kilkenny

Monique Kilkenny

Stroke & Ageing Research, Department of Medicine, School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Victoria; Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Victoria, Australia

Amos D. Korczyn

Amos D. Korczyn

Tel-Aviv University Medical School, Ramat Aviv, Israel

Rita Krishnamurthi

Rita Krishnamurthi

National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences (Deputy Director), School of Clinical sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand

Jane Marshall

Jane Marshall

School of Health Sciences, City, University of London, London, UK

Sheila Martins

Sheila Martins

Professor, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre; Head of Neurology Hospital Moinhos de Vento, Brazil; President Brazilian Stroke Network; Vice-President World Stroke Organization

Kristina Månsson

Kristina Månsson

Stroke policy and quality register research group, Lund University, Lund; Skåne University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Malmö, Sweden

George Mensah

George Mensah

Director, Center for Translation Research & Implementation Science, U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), Maryland, USA

Bruce Miller

Bruce Miller

Director, Memory and Aging Center; Co-Director, Global Brain Health Institute, University of California, San Francisco, USA

Robert Motl

Robert Motl

Exercise Neuroscience Research Laboratory, REACT Mobile Technology Laboratory, UAB Center for Exercise Medicine, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA

Christopher Murray

Christopher Murray

Director, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), University of Washington, Seattle, USA

Lorene Nelson

Lorene Nelson

Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Stanford University School of Medicine; Faculty Director of Research, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences; Stanford, USA

Bo Norrving

Bo Norrving

Professor in Neurology, Department of Clinical Sciences/Neurology, Lund University, Sweden

Njideka U. Okubadejo

Njideka U. Okubadejo

Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos State, Nigeria

Mayowa Ojo Owolabi

Mayowa Ojo Owolabi

Dean, Faculty of Clinical Sciences and Director, Center for Genomic and Precision Medicine, & Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, University College Hospital Ibadan, and Blossom Specialist Medical Center, Ibadan, Nigeria

Yuesong Pan

Yuesong Pan

China National Clinical Research Center for Neurological Diseases (NCRC-ND), Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, China

Jeyaraj Durai Pandian

Jeyaraj Durai Pandian

Principal and Professor of Neurology, Christian Medical College, Ludhiana, Punjab, India; Vice-President, World Stroke Organisation

Friedemann Paul

Friedemann Paul

Scientific Director, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, AG Clinical Neuroimmunology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.

Michael Piradov

Michael Piradov

Director, Research Center of Neurology, Moscow, Russia

Christian Gunge Riberholt

Christian Gunge Riberholt

Rigshospitalet Neurocenter, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Greg Roth

Greg Roth

Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), University of Washington, Seattle, USA

Behnam Sabayan

Behnam Sabayan

Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA

Perminder Sachdev

Perminder Sachdev

Co-Director, Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA), University of New South Wales (UNSW Sydney); Clinical Dirctor, Neuropsychiatric Institute, the Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia

Yvonne Teuschl

Yvonne Teuschl

Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Preventive Medicine, Danube University Krems, Austria

Amanda Thrift

Amanda Thrift

Head of Stroke & Ageing Research, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Amy (Amytis) Towfighi

Amy (Amytis) Towfighi

Director of Neurological Services, Los Angeles County Department of Health Services; Associate Professor of Neurology (Clinical Scholar), Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, USA

Teresa Ullberg

Teresa Ullberg

Stroke policy and quality register research group, Lund University, Lund; Skåne University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Malmö, Sweden

Theo Vos

Theo Vos

Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at University of Washington, USA

Wenzhi Wang

Wenzhi Wang

Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China

David Wiebers

David Wiebers

Emeritus Professor of Neurology, Consultant Emeritus, Departments of Neurology and Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota, USA

Tissa Wijeratne

Tissa Wijeratne

Chair of the Department of Neurology and Stroke at Western Health, Victoria, Australia

Henrik Zetterberg

Henrik Zetterberg

Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden; Dept of Neurodegenerative Disease, UCL Institute of Neurology, and Dementia Research Institute at UCL, London, UK

The Advisors

Foad Abd-Allah

Foad Abd-Allah

President African Academy of Neurology (AFAN); Professor of Neurology and Stroke Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt

Tina Charway-Felli

Tina Charway-Felli

President-Elect African Academy of Neurology (AFAN); Military Hospital, Accra, Ghana

The Programme

last update: 5th March 2021
Please note that the programme is subject to change, and will be updated continuously.
All speakers’ lectures will be recorded and available on-demand for a period of 3 months following the actual days of the Conference. Live Broadcast sessions will include live Q&A sections whereby speakers and convenors will be invited to attend the end of their sessions live, to take questions from the participants.

All times are in Central European Time (CET)

Day 1

Friday 19 March 2021

Live Broadcast

7:00-8:00 am CET

Teaching session 1
Chairs: W. Wang, L. Liu
Basics of clinical neuroepidemiology (observational studies)

07:00-07:17 Aims, design and pitfalls of cross-sectional studies: Application of cross-sectional design in large-sampled multicentered population-based surveys –  D. Ding
07:17-07:37 Writing a scientific paper and reporting an observational study – X. Leng
07:37-07:51 Aims, design and pitfalls of cohort studies – Y. Pan 

07:51-08:00 Discussion – Q&A

8:00-9:00 am CET

Teaching session 2
Chairs: D. Bennett, G. Logroscino
Basics of clinical epidemiology

08:00-08:17 Basics of biostatistics – D. Bennett
08:17-08:32 Type, design and pitfalls of RCTs and meta-analysis – G. Logroscino
08:32-08:49 Guidelines for reporting neuroepidemiological studies – D. Bennett

08:49-09:00 Discussion – Q&A

9:00-10:00 am CET

Plenary session: Global impact of COVID
Chairs: V. Feigin, D. Wiebers
 

09:00-09:03 Welcome from the Chair – V. Feigin
09:03-09:25 What the COVID-19 crisis is telling humanity (keynote lecture) – D. Wiebers
09:25-09:35 Impact of COVID-19 on neurological disorders – E. Beghi
09:35-09:45 Impact of COVID-19 on stroke care in China – L. Liu
09:45-10:00 Discussion – Q&A

 

 

10:00-10:30 am CET

break 30 minutes and posters viewing
  • Evaluating the potential of mobile phone-based applications in improving stroke awareness among with Auckland Population – N. Kaur
  • Evaluating the effect of personalised knowledge to reduce the risk of stroke (PERKS-International) – study design protocol – S. Gall
  • Electrode optimization for home-based health monitoring eeg acquisition – T. Raj
  • Stroke mortality trend in Uruguay: a 60 years national study – S. P. Salgado
  • Cerebral infarction in young adults. Analysis of 104 cases. – O. J. Fustes
  • Incidence and Prevalence of Stroke and its Risk Factors in the Philippines: A Systematic Review – M. E. Collantes
  • Incidence of stroke in argentina – initial data from a population-based epidemiological study (estepa) – M. Alet
  • A cluster-randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of stroke riskometer in improving stroke risk awareness in adults: a preliminary study – M. Z. M. Said
  • Feasibility of Dementia Assessments In the New Zealand (NZ) Indian Community – R. Krishnamurthi

10:30-11:45 am CET

Plenary session: Stroke prevention and policy implications
Chairs: G. Mensah, M. Owolabi

10:30-10:42 The Lancet Neurology Commission on stroke: Evidence-based pragmatic solution to reduce the global burden of stroke (keynote lecture) – M. Owolabi
10:12-10:22 Data science advances in the global prevention and treatment of stroke – G. Mensah
10:42-10:52 Using stroke statistics for policy purposes – challenges and opportunities – B. Norrving
10-52-11:02 Primary stroke prevention in Brazil: Experience, lessons, future – S. Martins
11:02-11:12 Practical solution for motivational mass stroke prevention – V. Feigin
11:22-11:32 From evidence to practice: What are we doing wrong? – A. Towfighi
11:32-11:45 Discussion – Q&A

 

11:45-12:45 am CET

Plenary session: Updates on and breaking news in clinical trials on stroke
Chairs: G. Hankey, M. Brainin

11:45-11:57 Health & Wellness Coaching for primary stroke prevention: PREVENTS trial (keynote lecture) – R. Krishnamurthi
11:57-12:07 The effects of the polypill in primary stroke prevention – Y. Teuschl
11:07-12:17 Endovascular thrombectomy – the challenges – S. Davis
12:17-12:27 Cognitive post-stroke disturbance (keynote lecture) – M. Brainin
12:27-12:37 Community health workers for stroke prevention. What is the evidence? – J. Pandian
12:37-12:45 Discussion – Q&A

 

 

12:45-14:00 pm CET

Plenary session: Updates on cognitive decline and dementia
Chairs: P. Sachdev, A. Ikram

12:45-12:57 New consortia for studying dementia (COSMIC, STROKOG, and ICC) (keynote lecture) –
P. Sachdev
12:57-13:09 Updates on dementia incidence, prevalence and risk factors in Europe – A. Ikram
13:09-13:21 Why dementia incidence rates are declining – R. Azarpazhooh (TBC)
13:21-13:33 Post-stroke cognitive impairment and dementia – R. Akinyemi
13:33-13:45 Can Alzheimer’s disease ever be prevented/cured – A. Korczyn
13:45-14:00 Discussion – Q&A

 

 

14:00-14:45 pm CET

break 45 minutes and poster viewing
  • Evaluating the potential of mobile phone-based applications in improving stroke awareness among with Auckland Population – N. Kaur
  • Evaluating the effect of personalised knowledge to reduce the risk of stroke (PERKS-International) – study design protocol – S. Gall
  • Electrode optimization for home-based health monitoring eeg acquisition – T. Raj
  • Stroke mortality trend in uruguay: a 60 years national study – S. P. Salgado
  • Cerebral infarction in young adults. Analysis of 104 cases. – O. J. Fustes
  • Incidence and Prevalence of Stroke and its Risk Factors in the Philippines: A Systematic Review – M. E. Collantes
  • Incidence of stroke in argentina – initial data from a population-based epidemiological study (estepa) – M. Alet
  • A cluster-randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of stroke riskometer in improving stroke risk awareness in adults: a preliminary study – M. Z. M. Said
  • Feasibility of Dementia Assessments In the New Zealand (NZ) Indian Community – R. Krishnamurthi

 

Day 1

Friday 19 March 2021

14:45-15:50 pm CET

Scientific session
Chairs: A. Gabet, N. De Jong

14:45-15:00 Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and a national lockdown on hospitalization for stroke and related 30-day mortality in France: a nationwide observational study – A. Gabet
15:00-15:10 Characteristics, management and in-hospital mortality of patients hospitalized for stroke with a concomitant diagnostic of COVID-19 in France – A. Gabet
15:10-15:20 White matter network structure as a substrate of cognitive brain reserve in cerebral small vessel disease: the maastricht study – N. De Jong
15:20-15:30 Epidemiology of epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries: experience of a standardized questionnaire over the past two decades – M. Vergonjeanne
15:30-15:40 Can engagement in socially and cognitively stimulating leisure activities compensate for other dementia risk factors? A prospective cohort study – L. Duffner

15:40-15:50 Discussion – Q&A

 

 

15:50-16:42 pm CET

Plenary session: Neuroepidemiology
Chairs: T. Vos, Y. Béjot

15:50-16:02 Global burden of neurological disorders (keynote lecture) – T. Vos
16:02-16:10 Updates on genetics in stroke risk – M. Dichgans
16:10-16:18 Neuroepidemiology in Latin America – C. Ketzoian
16:18-16:26 Impact of the ageing population on the contemporary profile of stroke patients: lessons from population-based registries – Y. Béjot
16:26-16:34 Heart-brain axis and brain health – B. Sabayan

16:34-16:42 Discussion – Q&A

 

16:42-17:34 pm CET

Plenary session: Biomarkers of movement disorders
Chairs: A. Korczyn, B. Miller

16:42-16:57 Frontotemporal dementia – B. Miller
16:57-17:12 Update on fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease – H. Zetterberg
17:12-17:27 Serum NfL – a biomarker ready for clinical applications? – F. Paul

17:27-17:34 Discussion – Q&A

 

17:34-18:30 pm CET

Scientific session
Chairs: D. Cadilhac, N. De Jong
 

17:34-17:46 Incidence of stroke in the urban area of western Ukraine: temporal trends and features of statistical accounting – O. Filipets
17:46-17:58 Impact of varying look-back periods on estimating the number of person-based first-ever occurrences of strokes using linked hospitalisation data – R. S. Ragavan
17:58-18:10 Long-term risk of stroke in 123, 696 people with existing cardiac disease: a study using data linkage – K. Robinson
18:10-18:20 Quality of life after stroke in a cluster randomized trial. Findings from standfirm – Z. Orman

18:20-18:30 Discussion – Q&A

 

18:30-19:00 pm CET

break 30 minutes – poster viewing and discussion
Chairs: A. Ikram, A. Korczyn

18:45-19:00 Q&A for all posters presented at 10:00-10:30 and 14:00-14:45

 

19:00-20:00 pm CET

Plenary session: Neurological care and rehabilitation (1)
Chairs: W. Carroll, J. Bernhardt

19:00-19:08 Barriers to neurological care: Addressing the needs (keynote lecture) – W. Carroll
19:08-19:16 Neuropsychological rehabilitation after TBI – S. Gupta
19:16-19:24 Updates on post-stroke rehabilitation – J. Bernhardt
19:24-19:32 Predictors of stroke recovery – M. Alt Murphy
19:32-19:40 Brain connectivity and recovery – A. Bonkhoff
19:40-19:48 They’ve got a bit better and they’re good enough to go back…” perspectives on stroke rehabilitation for aboriginal survivors – A. Thrift

19:48-20:00 Discussion – Q&A

 

20:00-20:56 pm CET

Scientific session
Chairs: A. Towfighi, S. Gall

20:00-20:08 Structured multimodal follow-up after stroke: implementation aspects of a new paradigm – T. Ullberg, K. Månsson
20:08-20:16 Australian Stroke Data Linkage Program: Using data to improve outcomes – M. Kilkenny
20:16-20:24 Disorders of Consciousness (doc): Implications for nursing along the continuum – T. Green
20:24-20:32 Utilizing disease registries to scale up neurology research in Africa: Experience from the Nigeria Parkinson Disease Registry – N. Okubadejo

20:32-20:40 Addressing lifestyle for stroke prevention – A. Towfighi

20:40-20:48 Disparities by diabetes status in the quality of care and long-term outcomes following acute stroke or transient ischaemic attack – M. Olaiya

20:48-20:56 Evaluating the effect of personalised knowledge to reduce the risk of stroke (PERKS-International) – study design protocol – S. Gall 

 

20:56-22:20 pm CET

Scientific session
Chairs: E. Camerucci, A. Eliakundu

20:56-21:04 Paramedic identification of stroke and associated access to reperfusion therapy: preliminary analysis of state linkage study – A. Eliakundu
21:04-21:12 Enhanced efficacy of acute intra-arterial recanalization therapies in female stroke patients – A. Bonkhoff
21:12-21:20 Sex differences in deep brain stimulation implants, management and levodopa adjustments in two population-based parkinsonism cohorts in minnesota – E. Camerucci
21:20-21:28 Incidence and Prevalence of Motor Fluctuations and Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s disease: A Comparison Between Two Population-based Cohorts in South East Minnesota – E. Camerucci

21:28-21:36 Neurocoach – A Virtual Therapist for Post-Stroke Recovery – M. Hittle

21:36-21:44 Timeline, Incidence, Frequency and Survival of REM Sleep Behavior Disorder in Overt Alpha-Synucleinopathies – A. Stang

21:44-21:52 Early-onset parkinsonism and early-onset parkinson’s disease: a population-based study (2010-2015) – E. Camerucci

21:52-22:20 Discussion – Q&A

  

Day 2

Saturday 20 March 2021

Live Broadcast

7:00-8:00 am CET

Teaching session 3
Chairs: D. Bennett, G. Logroscino
Basics of clinical epidemiology (continued)

07:00-07:25 Strengths and limitations of statistical analyses – D. Bennett

07:25-07:50 Studies and methods for descriptive epidemiology of rare neurodegenerative diseases in population studies – G. Logroscino

07:50-08:00 Discussion – Q&A

8:00-9:00 am CET

Meet the Editors
Chairs: B. Norrving, V. Feigin

08:00-08:25 Publishing your manuscript: My best advice – B. Norrving
08:25-08:50 Neuroepidemiology: Hints for publication – V. Feigin
08:50-09:00 Discussion Q&A

 

9:00-10:00 am CET

Plenary session: Epidemiology of neurological disorders
Chairs: A. Thrift, G. Deuschl

09:00-09:12 Epidemiology of stroke in China (keynote lecture) – W. Wang
09:12-09:22 Epidemiology of stroke in Kenya – L. Kaduka

09:22-09:32 The epidemiology of neurocognitive disorders from around the globe: findings from the COSMIC collaboration – P. Sachdev
09:32-09:42 Changes in the epidemiology of neurological disorders in Europe – G. Deuschl
09:42-09:52 Increased global burden of headaches – T. Wijeratne

09:52-10.00 Discussion Q&A

 

10:00-10:30 am CET

break 30 minutes and posters viewing
  • Excess mortality in stroke patients aged 80+ years receiving acute endovascular recanalization therapy, Eastern Denmark 2017-2019  – N.G. Laugesen
  • Validation of the Lebanese Arabic version of the BACS scale (the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia) among schizophrenic inpatients – Haddad
  • Stroke incidence in sars-covid epidemics: the experience of Odessa – Y. Vorokhta
  • Epidemiology of Parkinson disease in Odessa (2017-2019) – Y. Vorokhta
  • Population-based validation of prehospital stroke scales for the detection of large vessel occlusion: Dijon stroke registry – G. Duloquin
  • Low versus standard dose of intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase in ischemic stroke patients older than 80 years old: an observational study – L. Baptiste
  • Paradoxical effect of smoking on motor progression and dopaminergic putaminal denervation in Parkinson’s disease – D. Urso
  • Macrophages activities disorders in the acute period of varying severity experimental hemorrhagic stroke – A. Kulchikov
  • Disorders of the distribution of spleen lymphocytes by the phases of the cell cycle with experimental stroke of varying severity grades – A. Kulchikov
  • Incidence and cerebrospinalfluid (csf) biomarkers pattern in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (ftld) in the salento area puglia – C. Zecca
  • Migraine: a cross-sectional study among physicians and medical students regarding migraine prevalence, awareness and knowledge of diagnosis and management – H. Choudry
  • Stroke subtypes in cancer patients – L. Alshaikh-Mubarak
  • Acute Triage of Pediatric Stroke in Eastern Denmark – L. B. Bindslev
  • Association of ankle-brachial index with ischemic stroke outcome in diabetic patients: a case-control study – F. Razy
  • Reduction in Acute Stroke Admissions During the COVID-19 Pandemic – Data from the Israeli National Stroke Registry – C. Libruder
  • Pontine tegmentum infarct with uncrossed hemiparesis, a case report – A. Zamir
  • Comorbidities in patients with epilepsy and long-term follow-up: outcome and association – G. Giussani
  • The relationship between rough motor function level and family beck depression in serebral palsi patients – Y. Özkan
  • Application of motor learning principles in upper limb task-oriented training in stroke clinical trials – A scoping review – S. Durairaj
  • Synergies TO Prevent stroke – stopstroke – an interdisciplinary research program on stroke prevention – S. Gall
  • A qualitative study of factors affecting time to treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage – the reddish study – T.P. Nguyen

10:30-11:30 am CET

Plenary session: Digital devices for and psycho-social factors in neurologic disorders
Chairs: L. Nelson, M. Giroud

10:30-10:42 Innovative methods using digital devices in clinical and epidemiological research on neurologic disorders (keynote lecture) – L. Nelson
10:42-10:52 NeuroCoach: A virtual therapist for post-stroke recovery – M. Hittle
10:52-11:02 Psychosocial factors and stroke – M. Giroud
11:02-11:12 10 years of the Australian Stroke Clinical Registry: How the data have been used to inform policy and practice? – D. Cadilhac
11:12-11:22 Advances in neuropsychology for neurorehabilitation – S. Chopra
11:22-11.30 Discussion Q&A

 

11:30-12:30 am CET

Scientific session: Neurological care and rehabilitation (2)
Chairs: J. Pandian, M. A. Murphy

11:30-11:46 Spinal cord injury rehabilitation education on a global scale (keynote lecture) – L. Harvey

11:46-11:56 Stroke rehabilitation in low and middle income countries: an education agenda – D. Gandhi

11:56-12:06 Virtual reality in aphasia rehabilitation: Applications of EVA Park – J. Marshall

12:06-12:16 Exercise prescription and multiple sclerosis – R. Motl

12:16-12:26 Early rehabilitation approaches in severe acquired brain injury – C. Riberholt

12:26-12:30 Discussion Q&A

12:30-13:00 pm CET

break 30 minutes and posters viewing
  • Excess mortality in stroke patients aged 80+ years receiving acute endovascular recanalization therapy, Eastern Denmark 2017-2019 – N.G. Laugesen
  • Validation of the Lebanese Arabic version of the BACS scale (the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia) among schizophrenic inpatients – Haddad
  • Stroke incidence in sars-covid epidemics: the experience of Odessa – Y. Vorokhta
  • Epidemiology of Parkinson disease in Odessa (2017-2019) – Y. Vorokhta
  • Population-based validation of prehospital stroke scales for the detection of large vessel occlusion: Dijon stroke registry – G. Duloquin
  • Low versus standard dose of intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase in ischemic stroke patients older than 80 years old: an observational study – L. Baptiste
  • Paradoxical effect of smoking on motor progression and dopaminergic putaminal denervation in Parkinson’s disease – D. Urso
  • Macrophages activities disorders in the acute period of varying severity experimental hemorrhagic stroke – A. Kulchikov
  • Disorders of the distribution of spleen lymphocytes by the phases of the cell cycle with experimental stroke of varying severity grades – A. Kulchikov
  • Incidence and cerebrospinalfluid (csf) biomarkers pattern in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (ftld) in the salento area puglia – C. Zecca
  • Migraine: a cross-sectional study among physicians and medical students regarding migraine prevalence, awareness and knowledge of diagnosis and management – H. Choudry
  • Stroke subtypes in cancer patients – L. Alshaikh-Mubarak
  • Acute Triage of Pediatric Stroke in Eastern Denmark – L. B. Bindslev
  • Association of ankle-brachial index with ischemic stroke outcome in diabetic patients: a case-control study – F. Razy
  • Reduction in Acute Stroke Admissions During the COVID-19 Pandemic – Data from the Israeli National Stroke Registry – C. Libruder
  • Pontine tegmentum infarct with uncrossed hemiparesis, a case report – A. Zamir
  • Comorbidities in patients with epilepsy and long-term follow-up: outcome and association – G. Giussani
  • The relationship between rough motor function level and family beck depression in serebral palsi patients – Y. Özkan
  • Application of motor learning principles in upper limb task-oriented training in stroke clinical trials – A scoping review – S. Durairaj
  • Synergies TO Prevent stroke – stopstroke – an interdisciplinary research program on stroke prevention – S. Gall
  • A qualitative study of factors affecting time to treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage – the reddish study – T.P. Nguyen

13:00-14:00 pm CET

Scientific session
Chairs: L. Li, K. Dokova

13:00-13:08 Diet quality over middle adulthood and late-life subjective cognitive function among u.s. women – Y. Cao

13:08-13:16 Effect of varying look-back periods on estimating the trends in the incidence of stroke over time, using linked hospitalisation data – R.S. Ragavan

13:16-13:24 Associations of hematological and biochemical markers with intracranial atherosclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies – X. Tian

13:24-13:32 Survival, Functional Status and Recurrence Three Years After First-Ever Stroke in Southern Sweden – J. Aked

13:32-13:40 Population-based stroke registry in varna, Bulgaria: feasibility and pilot data – K. Dokova

13:40-13:48 Stroke and dementia, leading causes of neurological disability and death, potential for prevention – A. Avan

13:48-13:56 Early onset and increased risk of als in italian professional soccer teams – E. Pupillo

13:56-14:00 Discussion Q&A

 

14:00-15:00 pm CET

Scientific session
Chairs: S. Chopra, D. Bennett

14:00-14:08 Neuropsychological Rehabilitation after Traumatic Brain Injury in Low-Resource Settings – A Single Blind Randomized Study – S. Chopra
14:08-14:16 Recurrent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation: frequency and heterogeneity. – R.M. Jose
14:16-14:24 Job stress and risk of stroke in population 25-64 years in Russia/Siberia: gender issues. MONICA-psychosocial epidemiological study – D. Panov
14:24-14:32 Association between depression, anxiety and dementia among older people in Central Africa: EPIDEMCA population-based study. – A. Gbessemehlan
14:32-14:40 Do dynamometric grip and pinch strengths correlate with upper limb capacity measured using action research arm test in stroke survivors? – S. Sardesai
14:40-14:48 Costs of dementia in low and middle income countries: a systematic review – A. K. Malaha
14:48-15:00 Discussion Q&A

 

15:00-16:04 pm CET

Scientific session
Chairs: M. Piradov, Y. Bejot

15:00-15:08 Validation of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale emphasizes its moderate psychometric properties – A. Wiśniewski

15:08-15:16 Availability and cost of antiepileptic and psychotropic drugs after community-based interventions in Madagascar – S. A. Mioramalala

15:16-15-24 Epidemiology, diagnosis and management of prolactinoma patients in a single medical center in Morocco. – F. Gankpe

15:24-15:32 Trends in clinical features and risk factors of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A 14-year cohort study in China – L. Chen

15:32-15:40 Plasma Folate Levels in Relation to Cognitive Function: A community-based cohort of older adults in China – X. Chen

15:40-15:48 Instruments for investigation of epilepsy in low- and middle- income countries: a systematic review  – M. Vergonjeanne

15:48-15:56 An autoimmune encephalitis with anti-titin antibody positive : a case report – Y. Ge

15:56-16:04 Discussion Q&A

 

16:04-16:15 pm CET

break

 

 

16:15-17:00 pm CET

Q&A for all posters presented at 10:00-10:30 and 12:30-13:00

Chairs:
E. Gnedovskaya, G. Duloquin
D. Urso, L.B. Bindslev
S. Durairaj, C. Libruder

 

17:00-17:05 pm CET

Closing remarks, awards

 

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